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Golden Staph Infection (MRSA) and Possible Treatments

Notes by Jurriaan Plesman, BA, Psych, Post grad Dip Clin Nutr

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) also known as Golden Staph infection is a very difficult bacterial infection to treat and resistant to a large group of antibiotics. It is said to have developed as a result of years of antibiotic treatments. It is especially a problem in hospital environments (then called HA-MRSA), where special sanitary procedures have been introduced to fight the spreading of the this infection. But the infection can also be obtained in the wider community (then called CA-MRSA). A drug of choice for treating it has not has yet been established. MRSA infections are transmitted person to person by direct contact with the skin, clothing or area (sink, bench, bed, utensils) that had recent physical contact with MRSA-infected person. Read for an overview of MRSA at Medcinenet. Treatment of HA-MRSA mostly involves the use of vancomycin, often in combination with other antibiotic therapy. CA-MRSA usually starts as skin infections where draining of pus is often one of the first sign and symptoms of MRSA infection. Prevention of MRSA infections is by avoiding skin contact with infected people, wearing of gloves, gowns and masks and by stringent hygiene practices. See youtube.

The writing is definitely on the wall that conventional drug-oriented medicine will run out of pharmaceutical options to treat bacterial infections. Here are some time-honoured natural solutions that are worth investigating by complementary health practitioners. It is hoped that the scientific community will devote the necessary time and resources to explore mother nature’s secrets in helping people find a solution to this man-made illness.

Garlic

It has been reported in he The Sun, 31 October 2009 that a compound in garlic called allicin when the garlic clove is damaged and two compounds found in garlic come together can kill the super bug. Because of the short life of allicin it is difficult to use in medications. However a drugs using allicin in a frozen form has been created called AllicinMAX.

Dandelion

A herbal remedy Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) is reported to have anti MRSA activity.

Tea Tree Oil

A study is under way of evaluating the effects of daily washing with a 5 percent tea tree oil preparation on new MRSA infections among ICU patients in hospitals. However actual controlled trials did not support routine use of tea tree oil for eradication of MRSA. PMID: 15824699

The Irish wild flowers Elecampane or Marchalan (inula helenium) containing helenin and  Pasque Flower(pulsatilla vulgaris) containingthe glycoside ranunculin have been found to kill MRSA and that an extract of the plants was found to be 100 percent effective against the super bug. Mercola, Wikipedia See also Plants for a Future re Pasque Flower and here. Because of some its side-effects, his herb should only be prescribed by a trained herbalist.

Vitamin C

Dr RB Klenner: “Hydrogen peroxide will combine with ascorbic acid to produce a substance which is lethal to bacteria. I have seen diphtheria, hemolytic streptococcus and staphylococcus infections clear within hours following injections of ascorbic acid in a dose range of from 500 mg to 700 mg/kg body weight given intravenously and run in through a 20G needle as fast as the patient’s cardiovascular system would allow.”

Dr Klenner claims to have cured “hemolytic streptococcus and staphylococcus infections by employing vitamin C intravenously in a dose range of 500 to 700 mg/kg body weight. Doses under 400 mg/kg weight can be given with a syringe using sodium salt. This will always produce thirst. Fluids taken, just before or immediately after will eliminate this annoyance. Doses above 400 mg/kg body weight must be diluted to at least 1 gm to 18 cc solution, using 5% dextrose in water, saline in water or Ringer’s solution. One gram calcium gluconate must be added to these bottles injections to replace Ca ions pulled from the calcium-prothrombin complex. There is no limit  to the amount that can be administered by vein when honoring these two precautions” Dr Frederick Robert Klenner, Private Practice, Reidsville, N.C.

Curcumin

Curcumin is an extract from the spice of Turmeric. A study by  the Faculty of Pharmacy, Teheran, has shown that curcumin can be used to enhance the antibacterial activity of different antibiotics in a combination therapy with cefixime, cephotaxime, vancomycin, tetracycline against Staphylococcus aureus. No enhancing effect on the antibacterial activities of other antibiotics was detected. Moghaddam KM (2009)

The above article should be discussed with your health practitioner.

 


8 Responses

  1. Obi Divine says:

    Taking mega dose of vitamin c orally , can it have effect in combating staphyloccus infection ?

  2. le soleil says:

    hi , i just had a c-section for my first baby and i stayed @ the hospital 5 days , after 3 week time i had an infection in my middle finger and they discovered that it is MRSA and now am so worried am taking an oral antibiotics after i had the 100 ml antibiotics directly in the vein as 6 doses, now am so worried that my baby and husband will take this bag and we will live the rest of the life with it , could it be taked throught intercourse ? please answer me as soon as possible .
    regards
    le soleil

  3. Mary Sanders says:

    Garlic has been shown to be a great treatment option for Golden staph. There have even been clinical studies on people using a stabilized allicin garlic extract that has stopped many cases of MRSA. The study was done at the University of East London by Dr. Ron Cutler in 2008. There’s a good summary of garlic used for MRSA Staph on the page below.

    Garlic – an ancient remedy with a modern twist
    http://www.staph-infection-resources.com/treatment/alternative/garlic/

  4. ross says:

    i have sores on my back they heal but come back also on scalp scabs sting itch then bleed tried all any sugestions

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